Antonetti in ’08

Dave · December 8, 2006 at 8:05 am · Filed Under Mariners 

You may have noticed over on the left sidebar that there’s an image that looks an awful lot like a political button. In a sense, it is a political button, though for an election that isn’t run by democracy. Due to the way the offseason is unfolding, it is becoming apparent to us that, barring an unforseen miracle, the Mariners aren’t going to be contenders in 2007. Even in a best case scenario, where the young core takes a step forward and the aging veterans stave off decline, this is still an inferior team to that of the Angels, Rangers, and Athletics.

Given a public ultimatum to win or lose their jobs, the Mariners current baseball operations department will begin the year as underdogs, and it’s a distinction they’ve earned with moves like the Horacio Ramirez acquisition. Simpy put, this regime couldn’t afford to have a bad offseason following the Jarrod Washburn and Carl Everett debacles of last year, and while we have yet to see a disaster along the lines of those two signings, it’s fairly evident that the Mariners are not going to be able to sufficiently upgrade the team this winter in order to expect to challenge for the division crown next year.

So, we believe that a change in management is inevitable. While we will be the first to say that Bill Bavasi is a good person, and he’s been kind enough to spend time talking with us the past couple of years, we’re endorsing Chris Antonetti as his replacement. Like any good grass roots campaign, you can never start too soon, and this is a cause worthy of your support.

So, without further ado, an introduction to the man we hope is the next General Manager of the Seattle Mariners.

Who is Chris Antonetti?

He is currently the Assistant General Manager to Mark Shapiro, working for the Cleveland Indians. He is Shapiro’s go to guy on contract negotiations and evaluative analysis, as well as spear-heading most of the initiatives to create new programs that give the Indians a competitive edge on his opponents. The Indians have been the leader in using technology to their advantage for years, and they’ve leveraged their intellectual knowledge of systems into a sustained advantage on the field. Antonetti has been the man responsible for overseeing these areas and pushing for their use throughout the organization. A lot of the things that make the Cleveland Indians the best run organization in baseball are in place due to the work of Chris Antonetti.

Why is he qualified to be a major league GM?

Antonetti is going to be labeled as a “Moneyball” executive by the media, as he did not play professional baseball and has advanced degrees from elite universities. He got a bachelors in business administration from Georgetown and a masters in sports management from Massachusets, learning the academic side of how to be a successful manager. From there, he took a low level job with the Montreal Expos in their minor league operations department before joining the Indians organization in 1999 as, essentially, an intern. From 1999 until now, he has worked his way from the title of Assistant, Baseball Operations to Assistant GM (a position he earned in 2002), and has held numerous roles during that time. The Indians have had him work in both administrative and player development positions, and he’s spent numerous hours working with both scouts and statistical analysts.

No one understands how to use both subjective scouting information and quantifiable statistical data together as well as the Indians, and Antonetti has been successful in both sides of the baseball operations department. Under the leadership of John Hart and now Mark Shapiro, the Indians have become baseball’s most well-oiled machine. Antonetti has been a vital cog in that machine for the past seven years.

What are his unique strengths?

Antonetti has many things going for him, but a few notable traits set him apart. He’s brilliant, without a doubt, but there a lot of people in baseball who are extremely smart, and most of them would make terrible general managers. The most important responsibility a General Manager holds is to gain the respect of those who work for him and motivate them to do good work. In this respect, Antonetti is set apart from other executives with an academic background. He commands the respect of his employees, but also exudes humility with his soft-spoken manner. While he has his own set of convictions about truths as they apply to baseball, he seeks input from a variety of sources and seeks to find knowledge wherever it may lie, whether with new statistical research or old scouting truisms.

Antonetti isn’t the most outgoing person on earth, and he’s not the charasmatic figure that Billy Beane or even Bill Bavasi is, but he combines respect, humility, and intelligence in a package that makes him one of the best leaders of people in baseball.

Why do you want him to be the next GM of the Mariners?

The Mariners are an organization in transition and are looking for an identity. During the Pat Gillick era, the team focused heavily on the present success of the major league club at the expense of the farm system, and while they experienced short term gains on the field, the price was paid during the Bill Bavasi era, where the major league club was sacrficed in an effort to replenish the organization with young talent, both through trades and amateur acquisitions.

Now, however, the team has the foundation of a potential contender in place, with guys that can be built around in their pre-arbitration years and a nucleus of young talent that should form the basis for the Mariners in the near future. Bill Bavasi and his staff have done a very good job of changing the culture of the club towards valuing building from within, and he has helped get the team through the painful process of rebuilding. However, in all his years of running a franchise, both in Anaheim and now in Seattle, he’s yet to show a particular aptitude for surrounding that young talent with quality major league players.

Chris Antonetti understands player valuation at the major league level extremely well, and has had a hand in many of the Indians numerous good acquisitions over the years. While the Indians have shared the Mariners strong desire to build through the farm system, they’ve also been able to acquire quality players in trades and on the free agent market to put around their home grown talent, allowing them to contend in a competitive division despite restraints on their payroll.

The Mariners need a better philosophy of major leauge player acquisition. They need to do a better job of selecting pitchers, getting away from ideas of value based on minimually useful statistics such as W-L record and ERA and moving towards a more realistic understanding of how to project pitching ability. They need to stop collecting athletes with impressive skills and start collecting ballplayers who contribute runs on the field.

Most importantly, however, they need a philosophy that permeates the organization, from the parent club through the minor leagues. They need cohesiveness in what is being taught to their players as well as what is valued in terms of abilities. They need to establish a foundation to work from and a strong identity in what being a Seattle Mariner is all about.

The Indians have refined organizational cohesiveness, and while no one is perfect, they do it better than anyone.

Well, if he’s so great, then why does he need a grassroots campaign to get the job?

Chris Antonetti is 32-years-old, is unheard of by almost everyone who doesn’t cover baseball for a living, and has no experience as a professional ballplayer. In the eyes of most of the media, this will make him just another laptop-toting seamhead who focuses on what their computer tells them and has no respect for the establishment. For every Theo Epstein, who gained a modicum of respect after building a World Series champion, we see scathing rebukes written by local scribes when teams have hired guys with similar backgrounds, such as Paul DePodesta, Josh Byrnes, Jon Daniels, Andrew Friedman, or J.P. Ricciardi. In a city where Pat Gillick and his traditional ways are honored with the highest esteem, it’s going to be a very tough sell to get the Mariners to change directions and hire someone too young to be elected president.

In a division where Arte Moreno is willing to spend lavish amounts of money to leverage the Los Angeles market, Oakland is taking their highly efficient development strategy to a new ballpark, and Tom Hicks’ huge dollars in Texas are now being managed by a high quality team of executives led by Jon Daniels, the Mariners cannot afford to be behind the eight ball in terms of player evaluation.

The Mariners have the revenue streams and talent in place to build a contending baseball club. Chris Antonetti has the skills it takes to transform this club from a rebuilding process into perennial contender.

Antonetti in ’08. Spread the word.

Comments

65 Responses to “Antonetti in ’08”

  1. ira on December 8th, 2006 8:16 am

    Antonetti would be a great choice. But what about Kim Ng?
    What is she, chopped liver?

  2. Coach Owens on December 8th, 2006 8:21 am

    Well at this point anyone is better than Bavasi.

  3. pensive on December 8th, 2006 8:21 am

    Sounds great. Who best would be field Manager to complement him?

  4. Coach Owens on December 8th, 2006 8:25 am

    Might as well start campaigning for 2008 manager. Edgar Nartinez for 2008, spread the word.

  5. Manzanillos Cup on December 8th, 2006 8:29 am

    I have the narrow perspective of a fan that wants to see a winner, so I have a tough time seeing how Cleveland is “the best run organization in baseball”. Since Mark Shapiro took over in 2001, they’ve averaged 80.6 wins a year. In theory, they may be doing the right things, but the results aren’t there.
    Oakland has won 90 games six out of the last seven years with a similar payroll to the Indians. They get my vote.

  6. 88fingerslukee on December 8th, 2006 8:33 am

    I’m down with Edgar

  7. gwangung on December 8th, 2006 8:33 am

    Antonetti would be a great choice. But what about Kim Ng?
    What is she, chopped liver?

    No, she’s a GIRL.

    That alone disqualifies her with Armonstrong/Lincoln and most everyone one else in the current administration. (Maybe if Larson took over, or maybe Stanton)(yeah, as if anybody who is still working would want to be a Mariners CEO).

    If it takes a grassroots campaign for Antonetti, it’d take a commandment from on high to get Ng.

  8. manyoso on December 8th, 2006 8:37 am

    Interesting. Here is an old post by Will Carroll that ranks up and coming GM’s. Note that it has Antonetti as #3. Also note that John Daniels was ranked #7 since he hadn’t taken the Ranger’s position yet.

    Ten That Are Coming – GM Edition

  9. Eleven11 on December 8th, 2006 8:39 am

    Player evaluation is one skill, does he have much background or responsibilities in negotiations? Also, was he responsible for building a management team around him? In other words, would he have the respect and contacts to hire good executives? One valuable measure of a manager is the quality of his management team. Thank you for the post, very interesting individual.

  10. manyoso on December 8th, 2006 8:43 am

    And here is a good article on Antonetti describing what went into the decision not to resign Thome:

    Helping to separate head from heart, and gut instinct from statistical reality, is the role of the Indians’ confidential computer database, DiamondView. Consider it a kind of truth machine, whose function is to temper, or even override, subjective measurements with objective ones.

    Antonetti, the Tribe’s best analytical mind, oversees DiamondView’s use in team decisions such as the Thome negotiations. The database is believed to be among the most sophisticated in baseball. The Indians are so protective of it, they copyrighted it.

  11. Dave on December 8th, 2006 8:45 am

    DiamondView is amazing. I’ve seen it, and I was in awe.

  12. atait on December 8th, 2006 8:51 am

    Dave, what do you think of Mike Rizzo? He basically built the Diamondbacks’ farm system and is now grinding his teeth as the assistant to Jim Bowden in Washington.

  13. crazysob on December 8th, 2006 8:53 am

    Campaigning for Antonetti is all good. But it is like how we wanted to get Hudson and in the end, we got Horacio. We are talking about the same group of people who hired Bavasi here.

  14. atait on December 8th, 2006 8:55 am

    “grinding his teeth”? Is that the right term?

  15. deltwelve on December 8th, 2006 8:56 am

    “stabbing his eyes out”?

  16. Adam S on December 8th, 2006 8:57 am

    Seeing how we’ll be looking for a GM in October or November, shouldn’t this be “Antonetti in ’07″?

    I wouldn’t write off the season quite yet, though I concur that this Mariners team isn’t better than what we ended the season with or what we had going into last season. On the bright side, we aren’t planning to give 400 PA to Carl Everett or 150 IP to Pineiro, though I guess the latter isn’t a done deal. As Derek said in his Las Vegas win line review, teams often miss their projections by 10 wins; maybe this is the year the Mariners get lucky.

    That said, if the Mariners win this year, they’ll do it in spite of Bavasi not because of him. Like you, I like Bill Bavasi but with each passing day it becomes more clear that he’s not qualified to be a major league general manager. And the search for a new GM can’t start soon enough.

    So how do we make this campaign more than a rallying cry at USSM? Do we have a way to really be heard by TPTB?

  17. PositivePaul on December 8th, 2006 8:58 am

    So, I’m curious. What sets him apart from Paul DePodesta — how would those differences help his chances of getting hired on as a GM?

  18. Mariner Fan in CO Exile on December 8th, 2006 8:58 am

    [begin sarcasm] I don’t know about this DiamondView thing. Sounds a lot like the computer that started all the trouble in the Terminator. First this thing decides which moves a baseball team makes, soon it’s launching nukes at neighboring countries to destroy the parasite that is man. I like the Bavasi era, or better yet Woodword’s era – we break out the abacus, use obsolete statistics and make deals based on name recognition regardless of peripherals. That’s the way to give us hope every year. I am tired of these laptop-carrying children running the show. I want old-world sensibilities that bring annual hope, even if little in the way of real results [end sarcasm]

  19. sdlamm on December 8th, 2006 9:15 am

    Hmmm… based on his recap of the winter Meetings in today’s Times, I wonder if we couldn’t get Larry Stone to be the first high profile supporter of a grassroots effort to radically shift the way business is done at the upper tiers of M’s management.

    Stone’s article

  20. ChrisK on December 8th, 2006 9:20 am

    I don’t see the Lincoln/Armstrong regime hiring Antonelli for 2 main reasons:

    1. Don’t they hold a grudge against “Moneyball”-type GMs since Michael Lewis’ book was critical of Lee Pelekoudas and Benny Looper? I seem to recall Lincoln (or Armstrong) making derisive comments about the “Moneyball” approach, and it’s not like those guys are the forgive-and-forget types.

    2. Lincoln has always taked about avoiding the “Cleveland approach” of tearing down and rebuilding a team. And Armstrong made a really patronizing comment last year admitting that Cleveland had a “nice little team over there” but saying they didn’t want to follow their rebuilding approach. Wouldn’t hiring Antonelli be an admission that their “rebuild on the fly” approach didn’t work?

    Unless Lincoln & Armstrong are let go, I see another old-boys-club “name recognition” GM being hired to replace Bavasi.

  21. Eleven11 on December 8th, 2006 9:27 am

    Stone said, “The best thing that can be said about the Mariners’ winter so far is that they haven’t fallen victim to the sort of financial hysteria that has led to a series of mind-boggling deals throughout baseball.”
    I think they actually fall victim to it and tried hard to through buckets of money at mediocre players but failed.

  22. Panev on December 8th, 2006 9:29 am

    Does this mean Bavasi will not be attending the spaghetti feed this year?

    At least he didn’t re-sign Meche at $55 million.

    Time for a new GM and Manager -

  23. gk91 on December 8th, 2006 9:30 am

    I agree with #19 ChrisK 100%. Unless the Armstrong/Lincoln logjam is removed you won’t see anything other than retreads for GM and/or Managers.

  24. atait on December 8th, 2006 9:33 am

    Avoiding the Cleveland rebuilding process? Hey Mr. Lincoln, you do realize that the Indians are a legit contender next year, don’t you? Or that the Marlins are closer to contention than the M’s, don’t you?

    Goodness it is depressing being an M’s fan.

  25. gwangung on December 8th, 2006 9:34 am

    I agree with #19 ChrisK 100%. Unless the Armstrong/Lincoln logjam is removed you won’t see anything other than retreads for GM and/or Managers.

    Yup. THESE guys have no clue, as well.

    And they shouldn’t be the ones to sniff at Cleveland; it’s not like they’ve been doing that well at rebuilding.

    If they’re still in place, we’ll probably get a Frank Mattox-level hiring….

  26. Dave on December 8th, 2006 9:36 am

    So, I’m curious. What sets him apart from Paul DePodesta — how would those differences help his chances of getting hired on as a GM?

    DePo lacked basic interpersonal skills. People hated working for him, and he avoided the media like it was a disease. DePo just doesn’t have the personality to be a public figure. He’s a great behind-the-scenes guy, but he can’t be the face of your organization.

    Antonetti can.

  27. Evan on December 8th, 2006 9:42 am

    DePo lacked basic interpersonal skills.

    That’s why I like him so much.

  28. Ralph Malph on December 8th, 2006 9:45 am

    Now that Antonetti is identified as the darling of the stathead, webgeek, blogger fringe (as I’m guessing Lincoln would view USSM), does that torpedo his chances for the job?

  29. Mike Hargrove's Cameltoe on December 8th, 2006 9:52 am

    NERRRRRRRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDDDDSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

  30. Choska on December 8th, 2006 9:54 am

    Seriously, why wait till ’08. How about tomorrow?

    The only way to keep Ichiro in town is to do something NOW. Otherwise he’ll declare that he isn’t going to resign with the Ms by spring training, and he would be right to do so. I just can’t imagine the disaster that would be watching Bavasi trying to trade away Ichiro this July.

    Losing Ichiro won’t be a disaster. The Ms will still be a Major League baseball club and still get to play against other Major League teams. That’s about all you can say.

    But, those of you who have kids know that he is THE face of the Ms. Walk into any grade school in the Northwest and ask him who their favorite Mariner is and they will all shout in unison, ICHIRO!”

    I know all of the arguments about Ichiro, and I know the argument that if you could get good value for him then do the deal. But there will truly be no replacing him in the community, to the perception of the Ms (such as it is) in the US and Japan, and to an entire generation of kids in the Northwest.

    And I should also mention that the dude can hit, field, throw, and run. He’s one of the best to EVER lace up a pair of cleats.

    The issue now truly isn’t whether or not we’ll suck in ’07. That’s a done deal. The issue now is whether or not the Ms spend the next 10 years+ in complete mediocrity.

  31. Jack Howland on December 8th, 2006 9:56 am

    2. Lincoln has always taked about avoiding the “Cleveland approach” of tearing down and rebuilding a team. And Armstrong made a really patronizing comment last year admitting that Cleveland had a “nice little team over there” but saying they didn’t want to follow their rebuilding approach. Wouldn’t hiring Antonelli be an admission that their “rebuild on the fly” approach didn’t work?

    Lincoln and Armstrong are complementary of Cleveland’s job of rebuilding process. Cleveland lost 1.2 million fans over a two year period between 2001 and 2003. Despite the great job they have done rebuilding, those fans for the most part haven’t come back yet. Lincoln is scared that this will happen as well in Seattle.

    In my opinion Seattle’s overall plan wasn’t horrible. Bad signings (Sexson, Washburn, Spiezio, Everett, and others) and injuries to young pitchers was the biggest problem. Had they spent their free agent money wisely the would be in better shape.

  32. terry on December 8th, 2006 9:58 am

    I admire Antonetti but hiring him would strike me as too radical a move for the Mariners…. I think they’d sooner promote Hargrove…

  33. leetinsleyfanclub on December 8th, 2006 9:58 am

    As great as Antonetti’s skillset may be, the most important skill he, or anyone else, needs to be successful with the M’s is the ability to tell Lincoln and Armstrong to stuff it. As long as those two hacks continue to meddle in the M’s baseball decisions this organization is going nowhere but down the toilet.

  34. atait on December 8th, 2006 9:59 am

    29 – So do you think those kids who shout “Ichiroooooooooo!” will be more disappointed this year if we trade him, or next year, after he signs with the Yankees for 6/100?

    Honestly, I think there is a 1 in 5 chance that Ichiro stays. I don’t like those odds, so I say we start negotiations today. If Ichiro balks, we start informing teams of his availability. And the first team I’d call would be the Dodgers.

  35. atait on December 8th, 2006 10:01 am

    30 – Meanwhile, Seattle’s attendance numbers continue to plunge. Face it, many M’s fans in Seattle are of the bandwagon variety. They would feign indignance for a while (when deep down they don’t care), but would return in droves once the M’s start winning again.

  36. PositivePaul on December 8th, 2006 10:08 am

    NERRRRRRRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDDDDSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

    Heh. That makes Howard and Chuck the Alpha Betas. Where’s Booger when you need ‘im?

  37. Bender on December 8th, 2006 10:14 am

    NERRRRRRRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDDDDSSSSSSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

    STATHEADS!!!!!!

  38. gwangung on December 8th, 2006 10:19 am

    As great as Antonetti’s skillset may be, the most important skill he, or anyone else, needs to be successful with the M’s is the ability to tell Lincoln and Armstrong to stuff it. As long as those two hacks continue to meddle in the M’s baseball decisions this organization is going nowhere but down the toilet.

    I sorta put it another way–any middle manager’s job is to be able to convince the higher ups that their ideas are great (no matter how dumb they are) and that the best way to implement them is to do it the GM’s way (no matter how much they contradict with the higher ups’ ideas).

  39. terry on December 8th, 2006 10:20 am

    I know it is counterintuitive, but I don’t think the Ms are worried about attendance. Given the numbers below, at the bare minimum, I’d expect the rejection of the status quo if attendance was an issue.

    2000: 3,148,317
    2001: 3,507,326
    2002: 3,542,938
    2003: 3,268,509
    2004: 2,940,731
    2005: 2,689,529
    2006: 2,480,717

    Given the continuity in leadership and the lack of a *big name* addition to the roster that could generate excitement, i’d suggest a lack of PR momentum going into ’07 and the likelihood that the Ms will find it difficult to compete within their division might be the perfect storm that results in M’s struggling to hit 2,000,000 next year. That would be a big deal…

  40. Mike Hargrove's Cameltoe on December 8th, 2006 10:22 am

    On the plus side, we’d get WiFi at Safeco!

  41. ChrisK on December 8th, 2006 10:36 am

    2.5M fans to watch a boring last-place team for the third straight year, in addition to the team’s cash cow long-term media deals, is still a ton of revenue. IMO, this franchise can practically guarantee 2M fans per year as long as you have sunshine, 1-2 fan favorites on the team, and the family-friendliness of Six Flags’ Safeco Field.

  42. DMZ on December 8th, 2006 10:37 am

    This may be the widest gap between quality of initial post and comment thread in the history of USSM commenting.

  43. terrybenish on December 8th, 2006 10:43 am

    The problem is not that its not a good and intuitive choice, its that the Mariners have no credibility at any level now. Everyone knows that should a campaign be undertaken, what would probably happen is that they’d lure Woody Woodward out of retirement.

  44. Benno on December 8th, 2006 10:45 am

    Great write up. This is why I come here for news about the Mariners before I go anywhere else. Antonetti sounds like a great choise for the next GM, even though he is young(er than me….). I’m of two minds about Bavasi, as I think he does some things good, and some things very poorly, so I agree that his time is done. Lets hope that the M’s brass can make as strong an arguement when they make their next hire.

  45. Grubbie on December 8th, 2006 11:04 am

    Antonetti in ‘08. Spread the word.

    What would help would be some sweet stickers or bumper stickers. I know I would def be down for buying a sticker to throw on my car.

  46. Paul on December 8th, 2006 11:24 am

    Thanks for at least putting some hope in the bottom of the box Dave. It’s been a bleak week and probably a little early to put on the wait ’til next year shoes but they feel better than the shit stained boots we are stuck in.

    Antonetti sounds intriguing. I’d be concerned about his decision making abilities since his roll now is loading the gun but Shapiro is the guy pulling the trigger. That seems to be Bavasi’s primary shortcoming. We were all set up for a promising off season, then a few dominos fall, BB panics and makes a split second tragic blunder.

    Any more insight into Anotonetti’s rationality under fire? And networking and negotiating skills? And can he take Diamondview with him or can he recostruct a reasonable facsimile here?

  47. eponymous coward on December 8th, 2006 11:27 am

    This may be the widest gap between quality of initial post and comment thread in the history of USSM commenting.

    We don’t even have Corco bringing in amusing anecdotes about traffic in McCall or music choices for his dates.

    I would think that a lot of the more intelligent commentary on this would be “Uh, yeah, we agree. Megadittoes”. I’ve been arguing that this job is over Bavasi’s head for years. As such, there’s not a lot to add about this.

    My comment is that, knowing upper management, they might not to want to bring a soft-spoken, unobtrusive type in, since I suspect they’d much rather have the arrows coming out of the GM’s back than Lincoln’s or Armstrong’s.

    Also: doesn’t this mean we lose Bob Fontaine? Or do you suspect we could work a deal keeping him in place for a year or two, with the understanding that if Bavasi ends up a GM again he’s welcome to join him?

  48. Plim on December 8th, 2006 11:53 am

    About Antonetti and Arte Moreno…

    Antonetti was first hired by a guy named Stoneman, when he was the guy behind the scenes in Montreal. Stoneman is slated to move to the role of advisor after this season. Given that Stoneman has filled the Angels front office with a host of former Expos, including Baseball American’s socuting director of the 80s or was it 90s, (Gary Sutherland), it’s already been mentioned in Southern Cal that Antonetti may be someone the Angels turn to if indeed they decide to give the jon to someone other than their assistant GM.

    That would IMO immensely suck.

  49. atait on December 8th, 2006 12:07 pm

    Dave, what do you know about Mike Rizzo, now working as Bowden’s assistant GM. I’ve read good things about him. He has a great eye for talent (see Arizona’s crop of young players), and was well-liked in Arizona as well.

  50. Jim Thomsen on December 8th, 2006 12:12 pm

    Another question for your post, Dave:

    What sort of sea change in Mariner leadership and governing organizational philosophy would have to take place for the M’s to even be able to see someone like Antonetti clearly for who he is and what he uniquely offers?

  51. kentroyals5 on December 8th, 2006 12:49 pm

    Funny…seems like the Mariners were ready for all the fan anger about the trade…here is the email I got in return for showing my frustration:

    Thank you for your email. We really appreciate hearing from our fans – even if they are angry or disappointed – and we do read every email. Your comments regarding the team’s moves at the winter meetings as well as the specific trade of Rafael Soriano for Horacio Ramirez have been forwarded to the appropriate department for consideration. Thank you again for taking the time to contact us with your opinion; we hope to see you out at Safeco Field in 2007 – Go Mariners!

    Seattle Mariners Fancare

    And this is the email all of my friends received when they emailed them…hmmm, musta known that there would be some angry fans.

  52. Celadus on December 8th, 2006 1:25 pm

    Part of the Cleveland approach depends on getting to and signing or trading for appropriate players before other organizations can pull the trigger. Antonetti might be wasted here until Armstrong/Lincoln either leave or at least remove their fingers from other regions and put them in the vicinity of a trigger.

  53. CCW on December 8th, 2006 1:37 pm

    I’m going to unveil an “IMPEACH BAVASI” banner in the first inning on opening day. Anyone want to join forces and post an “ANTONNETI M’S GM ’08″ sign?

  54. byronebyronian on December 8th, 2006 3:02 pm

    Funny…seems like the Mariners were ready for all the fan anger about the trade…here is the email I got in return for showing my frustration:

    Thank you for your email. We really appreciate hearing from our fans – even if they are angry or disappointed – and we do read every email. Your comments regarding the team’s moves at the winter meetings as well as the specific trade of Rafael Soriano for Horacio Ramirez have been forwarded to the appropriate department for consideration. Thank you again for taking the time to contact us with your opinion; we hope to see you out at Safeco Field in 2007 – Go Mariners!

    Seattle Mariners Fancare

    And this is the email all of my friends received when they emailed them…hmmm, musta known that there would be some angry fans.

    I got the same email regarding my tirade against the announcement that Dudley was going to manage another season (argh). It’s the same freaking letter except for the stuff about the trade.

  55. byronebyronian on December 8th, 2006 3:03 pm

    I like Kim Ng as well and think she’d be a great GM.

  56. Pete on December 8th, 2006 4:05 pm

    Important question: Will there be “Antonetti in ’08″ t-shirts going up for sale the USSM swag section. Count me in. I’ll wear it alternating with my Felix is my King t-shirt.

  57. The Decider on December 8th, 2006 4:15 pm

    I’ll buy one of those Antonetti shirts also.

  58. Pete on December 8th, 2006 4:17 pm

    Sounds like a movement Decider. All in favor of Antonetti T’s to wear to M’s games!! Hook us up USSM!

  59. msb on December 8th, 2006 5:39 pm

    I believe that I already nominated Ms Ng as Antonetti’s running mate.

    Campaigning for Antonetti is all good. But it is like how we wanted to get Hudson and in the end, we got Horacio.

    well, except that Hudson was withdrawn from the pool by outside forces. I suppose Antonetti could be withdrawn by having the Angels hire him…

  60. Josh on December 8th, 2006 6:05 pm

    I think it would be nice to link the Antonetti emblem to this post. It should draw more interest if people have a one-stop place to find all the basics behind your reasoning.

  61. Thoan on December 8th, 2006 8:22 pm

    In a city where Pat Gillick and his traditional ways are honored with the highest esteem, it’s going to be a very tough sell to get the Mariners to change directions and hire someone too young to be elected president.

    That’s why Howard Lincoln has to precede Bill Bavasi out the door.

  62. Phoenician Todd on December 13th, 2006 9:36 pm

    I agree, we need him now, fucking now!!

  63. Carson on December 19th, 2006 11:00 am

    So, we’ve all seen beyond the GM, and looked to Lincoln and Armstrong as the potential issue. Well, how about the fact that our owner has never seen us play? Heck, he doesn’t even take advantage of whatever fancy get togethers the other owners have. Yeah, I know baseball is more of a business that it is a sport these days, but I don’t even see good business moves being made. If Snelling/Fruto had been traded for prospects that were cheaper, I may be able to live with that. This makes no sense though, financially or statistically.

    Since I have such a desire of dead horse beating…

    I don’t know that anyone, with current ownership, could revive this franchise as GM. And if Mr. Antonetti is as brilliant as we’re thinking, I doubt he’d not see that. What other GM spots could be opening? Unless it’s the Royals, I doubt there is a worse ran franchise potentially looking for a new GM.

  64. VinceB on December 21st, 2006 1:09 pm

    What exactly have the Indians won since Antonetti has really been involved? Call me crazy, but I would start looking at guys on clubs that have actually won – like Mozelik (STL), Hahn (CHI), Hill (FLA) or even Forst (OAK). Antonetti sounds like more sizzle than steak.

  65. charlesf on December 22nd, 2006 12:14 pm

    I suppose the most ‘famous’ of the talent scouts right now is Logan White of LA (that LA to Seattle pipeline…). I know little about him except that he gets the credit for builing the Dodgers’ farm system, which has been ranked top 5 for the past few years by “Baseball America”. If Lincoln & Co. shunned “Moneyball” yet again, White may be up for an interview. He did work with DePodesta for a couple of years, so perhaps something’s rubbed off on him. Then again, good scout guys aren’t necessarily the best at trades and free agent signings.

    So some good candidates:

    1. Antonetti
    2. White
    3. Mike Rizzo
    4. Gord Ash might be interesting, given his time in Milwaukee.

    I wasn’t aware that Stoneman was going to step down after 2007. Why?

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