Game 74, Mariners at Yankees

marc w · June 20, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

King Felix vs. Jonathan Loaisiga, 4:05pm

Happy Felix day. I’m a bit nervous on this happy occasion, as I’d very much like to see the M’s offense shake off some rust and score a bunch of runs, and I don’t want a few series losses to give the Angels a chance to catch up right after the M’s put some distance between themselves and the Halos. I’ll say that any opportunity the M’s give me to feel nervous as opposed to numb and resigned is a gift.

Domingo German looked amazing against the M’s last night, and Jeff Sullivan’s got a timely piece on the details of the run German’s on right now. He looks like he could develop into a very good starter, given his velocity, a solid change-up and a good breaking ball. That repertoire and the Yankees’ light-on-fastballs usage has been remarkably effective against just about everyone the past few years, but what sets them apart is that they seem able to essentially clone pitchers who can do this.

Take tonight’s starter, Jonathan Loaisiga. He, too, throws a fastball in the mid/high 90s, has a firm change with a bit more armside run and moderate drop, and then a hard, slurvy curve. Loaisiga’s mechanics mean that his FB has slightly less run than German’s, but everything else looks very similar – the change gets 5″ more run, and the curve’s break is just about identical, too. Loaisiga’s velocity is a touch higher than German’s, which isn’t a great sign. Where do the Yankees get all of these guys? Minor trades and minor free agent signings, as I discussed yesterday. The key, though, seems to be that the Yankees are able to essentially clone their biggest player development success: Luis Severino.

Severino throws harder than just about everyone, so he’s got a touch better FB than German/Loaisiga, but the parallels are kind of spooky. Loaisiga’s heater averaged 96.4 MPH in his one start, and had 9.38″ of vertical rise, with about 3″ of armside run. Severino’s has averaged 98.3 MPH (!) this year, with 9.39″ of rise and 4″ of armside run. They both throw a change at 88 MPH, with essentially the same vertical movement; Loaisiga’s gets a touch more run, though that could be a small sample thing. Severino’s breaker is a slider, so it’s firmer and has more horizontal movement than Loaisiga’s slurve, but still – these are very similar pitchers.

That’s the key to creating a sustainable, dominant team: replicating player development successes. The M’s turned James Paxton from frustrating, oft-injured, command-plagued enigma into the team’s ace. Imagine if they could do that with other lanky over-the-top-throwing starters they had in the minors? I’d take another 3-4 Paxtons, even if none of them were quite as good as the original.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, CF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Span, LF
7: Healy, 1B
8: Gamel, RF
9: Zunino, C
SP: FELIX.

2nd round pick Josh Stowers homered in his pro debut last night for Everett, who beat Hillsboro. Arkansas sewed up a playoff spot in the Texas League with a win over NW Arkansas, and Tacoma swept the I-Cubs at Cheney. Everett’s in Vancouver tonight, while Tacoma’s off. Modesto and Clinton had All Star Games in their leagues last night, so they get another night off for their mid-season break.

Game 73, Mariners at Yankees

marc w · June 19, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

Marco Gonzales vs. Domingo German, 4:05pm

The M’s head to the Bronx to take on the formidable Yankees, whose line-up is one of the league’s best. They’ve garnered attention (and envy) by pairing first-round colossus Aaron Judge with trade coup Giancarlo Stanton, all while staying under the luxury tax threshold. To do *that* they’ve had to piece together a rotation around aging vet CC Sabathia, and that’s gone better than I think anyone would’ve anticipated.

As Travis Sawchick wrote today, the Yanks have turned a bunch of low-bonus lottery tickets and low-minors trade targets into a rotation that’s among the league’s best. Today’s starter, righty Domingo German, was acquired from the Marlins and needed TJ surgery almost immediately. Once healthy, he was throwing in the mid-upper 90s, and has an effective curve and change, allowing him to be successful to both righties and lefties. Formerly a command/control guy, he’s now something of a raw fireballer, with very high K rates, but also high walk and HR rates, which is why he’s a back-of-the-rotation guy for NY – albeit a back of the rotation guy with a K% pushing 30% for his brief MLB career.

Marco Gonzales is the M’s biggest player development success since James Paxton emerged from Tacoma touching 100 MPH, but it’s a much different kind. He’s *still* much the same as he was out of Gonzaga. He’s not someone who’ll wow scouts with velo, but whose command allows him to avoid loud contact and misses enough bats to succeed in 2018-style baseball. Sure, there’ve been mechanical tweaks along the way, both in Seattle and in St. Louis, but it’s more about making him more successful with his current approach than rethinking the whole package. I think I’ve struggled with the Dipoto regime because I look at the Yankees/Astros models as the ones to emulate – I want a Gerrit Cole and Charlie Morton and Jose Altuve and Luis Severino and Aaron Judge. The whole approach with the M’s seems much more limited, and still, a bit more spotty. Even with lower ambitions, there’ve been missteps (as, to be clear, there have been in New York and Houston as well). Still, with the M’s way up in the wild card and the Angels reeling, you’ve got to hand it to them: it’s worked. Let’s hope it keeps working and that this season just gets even more fun.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Span, LF
8: Zunino, C
9: Heredia, CF
SP: Gonzales

Game 72, Red Sox at Mariners

marc w · June 17, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

Mike Leake vs. Eduardo Rodriguez, 1:10pm

Last night, Wade LeBlanc, the guy the M’s signed off of waivers at the end of spring training, tossed 7 2/3 brilliant innings at one of the top offenses in the league, yielding 2 hits and no runs with *9* strikeouts. If this blog has any sort of purpose (don’t answer that), it would be to help explain a result like that. Sure, we need explanations of the macro phenomenon, with the M’s 21 over .500 and swatting away good teams – even teams that appear to be better in a true-talent sense. But the micro as well: what the hell is Wade LeBlanc, journeyman soft-tosser, *doing* when he frustrates an offense like Boston’s?

I know what I’m supposed to do, but here’s the honest truth: I have absolutely no idea. I’m looking at data like it’s going to explain it, and it’s just not. Did he keep the ball out of the center of the zone? No, not really. Different pitch mix? There were a lot more change-ups, but he’s done similar things before, and let’s be honest here: ALL of the pitches, of whatever type, were thrown by Wade LeBlanc, so pure stuff probably isn’t the key to this mystery. Did he have a velo spike? Ha ha ha, nooooo. So, dear readers, I’ve got nothing. He attacked, he showed good command, he refused to give in and walk hitters, and all of that matters. But he does that a lot – there’s precious little to point to and say, there, that’s where LeBlanc did something different, and that’s what made his night so special.

I’ve been thinking about that with regards to the team’s performance overall. They’ve won in different ways, with different players powering them for a week or so at a time. Coming into this series, the story was about their offense, which helped bail out their pitchers who were themselves bludgeoned by Mike Trout. Haniger, Healy and company slugged their way through the Angels bullpen, and that was enough. This series is the inverse of that, where the Red Sox have stymied the M’s offense, only for their pitchers – including Felix and LeBlanc – to toss some of their best games of the year and keep them in it. Both offense and pitching have been a bit above average on the year, but again, the key has been the timing of it all – the pitchers were great in low-scoring games, and the offense stepped up when Trout went all Trout on the M’s. It’s hard to pick out a signature style or aspect of the game that the M’s dominate at, except their sense of drama and style.

But the longer this goes on, the more I keep thinking about something I talked about way back when Dipoto got this GM job and announced from his first few hires what he wanted to do. Dipoto clearly cared about development, and that’s been an aspect of his tenure that I’m still not fully on board with. I still think the M’s minor league player development system isn’t quite firing on all cylinders, but it’s equally true that they haven’t needed it this year. That’s because the other half of Dipoto’s development strategy – seen with the hiring of Andy McKay and Scott Servais – was development *at the big league level.* That was intriguing, and a little less proven. Can you really teach plate discipline or command after a player’s had years of coaching in the minors?

As I said at the top, there’s nothing definitive here, but the returns are starting to mount for a cautious “maybe so.” It’s not team-wide; we’ve seen Mike Zunino struggle to maintain the gains he made last year, and Felix has been maddeningly inconsistent. But something’s going on – players in slumps pull out of them and don’t linger on the roster pulling down overall production. Marco Gonzales seems to be *exactly* who Dipoto thought he was going to be in 2017, despite the fact that he spent much of 2017 disappointing. Mike Leake was great in September, surprisingly terrible in April, but has been great since. Dee Gordon hasn’t been great in a while, but let’s not forget the fact that he had to learn to play CF at the big league level – and did it pretty well – before moving back to 2B. This isn’t so much about players blowing projections out of the water, though Mitch Haniger and Jean Segura have certainly done that. It’s about not allowing black holes to develop. It’s those black holes that have sunk so many M’s seasons in the past – those rally-killing spots at the bottom of the order. Ben Gamel looked like he was on the way to becoming one in April, and at other times, Ryon Healy looked like he’d do it too – but neither has.

I hadn’t really seen this aspect of the M’s before – it always seemed like players had to leave to really get better: Zunino and Paxton in Tacoma, for example, or Chris Taylor in Los Angeles. They’re not miracle workers or anything, but I’m glad to see this development.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Heredia, CF
8: Gamel, LF
9: Freitas, C
SP: Leake

2018 Everett Aquasox Preview(-ish)

Jay Yencich · June 17, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

This is a bit late, but I’ve also been bouncing back and forth between time zones with various levels of service and that seems like a plausible enough excuse. That’s going to continue, by the way, so don’t anticipate me being quick on the reply.  This year the Aquasox have a pretty normal looking roster out of the gate hahaha wow amazing when the draft has already happened. I mean, I dog pretty regularly on the contemporary draft for being less compelling with the drawn-out selection process and the hard caps on pools, but the Mariners were never much to indulge in the first place and we now sign players pretty quickly without that added bargaining room.  That broadly seems appealing, but I also still miss the quirks of the draft-and-follow process.

I’m not sure what to think of this staff overall, partly jet lag, admittedly. The outfield core group, I would expect to be the part of the offense that really carries the team and the catching situation will be interesting to see how it settles. I know who’s supposed to be starting in the short term, but there aren’t too many that I’m enthusiastic about and the relief corps probably come out as more experienced and reliable.  Not all of them will be relievers after this year either, although the ones that only recently began pitching probably will stay in the bullpen. The infield…. There are just too many players and most of them are listed as second basemen, because that’s what the draft did for us. Good luck with that, Jose Moreno.

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Game 71, Red Sox at Mariners

marc w · June 16, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

Wade LeBlanc vs. Steven Wright, 5:15pm

A day after another unbelievable comeback, the M’s make their national TV debut for 2018. Fox Sports is televising the game, hence the odd start time. The M’s have been one of the league’s better stories of the year, and part of it is that they seem so perfect for TV – Dee Gordon acting as the hype man, Cruz is the classic slugger, Haniger’s all-around brilliance has included a few made-for-TV defensive plays recently. Add to that the fact that the M’s have played so many close games, and have had innumerable comeback wins, and I’m actually surprised they haven’t had more national games yet.

All of that said, viewers tuning in tonight will see a very un-2018 game. With velocity ticking up year after year, pulling the leaguewide K rate with it, today’s game features two starters with the lowest average velocities in the game. Wade LeBlanc’s sinker is over 1.5 standard deviations slower than the league mean, and his four-seam (which he uses sparingly) is over 2 full standard deviations slower. And yet LeBlanc’s the fireballer tonight, as the M’s face Boston knuckleballer Steven Wright and his 76 MPH floater. When Wright does try to sneak a fastball past a batter (something he does around 7% of the time), it comes in around 82-85, or 3 full standard deviations from the mean.

Not everything about their game is anachronistic, though. In the past, both Wright and LeBlanc have suffered from problems with the long ball. Wright made only 5 starts last year, giving up 9 dingers in 24 IP. LeBlanc’s last go-round with the M’s saw him yield 14 in 50 innings back in 2016. It’s a warm night, and with two pitchers throwing sub-batting practice speeds, we could see several balls leave the yard. But part of why this match-up is so interesting is that both pitchers are having remarkable seasons avoiding big innings despite those tendencies. Both have incredible strand rates, both are running low BABIPs. Yes, knuckleballers and lefties often DO run low BABIPs, so this isn’t just a “regression is coming” notice. It’s just something to look for – how exactly do they manage to generate weak contact on a consistent basis? Knuckleballs are odd, because you can’t really see anything in their movement data – in general, they don’t have spin, and thus don’t really break. The late movement or fluttering that confounds batters tends to confound efforts to measure them, too. Still, it’s a known unknown; knuckleballs are often very, very difficult to hit (except when they’re not). I simply don’t know what’s going on with Wade LeBlanc. I enjoy it, but I’m baffled it.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Span, LF
8: Zunino, C
9: Heredia, CF
SP: LeBlanc

Everett kicked off its season last night, and LookoutLanding’s got a great preview of the AquaSox 2018 – take a look. They’ll look to rebound from a down 2017, a year that featured slow starts from a number of international prospects, and then had plenty of turnover as many of those players moved to new clubs following Jerry Dipoto’s midseason trades for David Phelps and others.

Their roster features a mix of 2017 and 2018 draft picks and a sprinkling of players who’ve moved up from the Dominican league in the past. Felix’s brother Moises is the pitching coach, and he’ll work with recent draft picks like Joey Gerber, Penn Murfee, Michael Plassmeyer, and Grant Anderson. The position players are highlighted by Keegan McGovern, who’s coming off a huge year for Georgia, and Josh Stowers, the M’s 2nd-round pick out of Louisville.

They lost their first game of the year to Hillsboro, 5-2, but they’ll get after it again tonight in Everett with Carlos Hernandez on the hill. It’s Chris Taylor bobblehead night, so you’ll come away with a cool souvenir and bad memories of one of Dipoto’s least effective trades.

Tacoma beat Omaha 5-2, with Mike Marjama hitting his 5th HR. Christian Bergman takes the mound tonight for Tacoma, who welcome the Iowa Cubs for a once-every-two-years visit. Manager Pat Listach is on vacation, so hitting coach David Berg will manage the series. Why did Listach schedule a vacation during the year? Apparently the Mariners *require* managers to take a four-game vacation once a season, and this is when Listach chose his.

Williams Perez tossed 6 sharp innings as Arkansas edged Springfield 3-1. Max Povse starts tonight’s game for the Travelers.

Stockton blanked Modesto 3-0, who got a solid start from Reggie McClain in a losing effort. The Nuts had just two hits in the game off of Ports starter Dustin Hurlbutt, who’s now thrown 12 scoreless innings against Modesto, giving up just 4 hits.

Beloit demolished Clinton 9-1, as Oliver Jaskie and Stephen Moyers got hit hard. Ryne Inman takes the mound for the Lumberkings tonight. Inman’s coming off of two mediocre starts; hopefully he can get back to the form he showed in much of May.

Game 70, Red Sox at Mariners

marc w · June 15, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

James Paxton vs. Rick Porcello, 7:10pm

Last night’s 2-1 loss is the kind that, in other circumstances, would feel bitterly frustrating: the M’s lost despite a strong 7 IP from Felix, they got the first two runners in the 9th on and then squandered them, classic Mariners, right? I don’t know about you, but it felt almost encouraging. If this club gets actual production from Felix, they look less like an overachieving group and more like a solid team that’s playing just a touch over their heads. If they are in the game against the league’s best team, with a former Cy Young winner on the hill, and with the M’s giving the ball to their worst starter (god it sucks writing that), then this team can play with anyone. I mean, we knew that, but given that even great teams will lose 60-70, I don’t feel bad at all about that one going into the loss column. Sure, it’d be nice if the Astros stopped winning, but I’m honestly not as interested in them. The M’s need to hold off the Angels, and that effort’s going swimmingly right now.

Big Maple’s going for the M’s tonight, giving them their best odds per Fangraphs/538, and while Rick Porcello’s having a solid year again, I think neutrals would agree that Paxton’s the best starter going tonight. Porcello came up as a sinkerballing ground ball kid with Detroit, and one who had a good amount of success, but who never quite pitched up to his solid #3 peripherals. Boston pretty clearly reworked his entire approach, and while he’s had some serious ups and downs, he turned in a Cy Young campaign two years ago and is again pitching like a good #3 in what’s one of the league’s deepest rotations. Initially, Boston had him throw more of his four-seam fastball, the pitch that made him the most talked-about high school pitcher in the 2007 draft (and whose bonus demands saw him slide down the 1st round). His GB% fell dramatically right as the HR surge was getting underway, leading to a big increase in runs-allowed despite a career high in K rate. 2016 was much, much better, as his HR/FB ration dropped, allowing him to take advantage of his newfound ability to miss bats. He went 22-4 and earned his first Cy Young. Last year was another campaign tanked by HRs and BABIP, followed by 2018 in which those trends reversed, making him look solid again.

His K:BB has been pretty stable in Boston, but he’s shifting his approach a bit, using a lot more breaking balls, especially his slider. Interestingly, that increased use of bendy pitches has put a stop to his free-falling GB%, and it’s back up to just over league average after three years below it. Yes, he’s sitting on a career low HR/FB, and so some of this year’s success is luck. But he’s also reducing the number of fly balls allowed in the first place.

That last series against the Mike Trouts has put a bit of a damper on the M’s amazing trend towards limiting HRs-allowed, something Boston’s also been quite good at this year. Felix did a brilliant job against the Red Sox’ big three of Mookie Betts, JD Martinez and Andrew Benintendi last night, and that’s something Paxton will have to repeat tonight. The M’s best hitters, Mitch Haniger and Jean Segura, have been worth about 13.5 runs above average this year, which is great before the halfway point of the year. Boston’s big three have all passed the 20 run mark at this point, with Betts the best of the bunch at 30.4.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Gamel, LF
8: Heredia, CF
9: Zunino, C
SP: ACER ACER ACER ACER

As you saw in last night’s game, the M’s made some moves, optioning Dan Vogelbach back to Tacoma, DFA’ing Mike Morin, and calling up RP/SP Rob Whalen and RP Nick Rumbelow, who found his way into a one-run game. Rumbelow pitched for the Yankees in 2015, and did pretty well, then had TJ surgery and a setback and hadn’t pitched competitively this season until this month. He showed the exact same fastball velocity he did back in 2015 – around 93 MPH. He still showed the same secondaries – a change and a slider – but they’ve been transformed a bit. While his FB velo was unchanged, the other pitches were much, much faster. The slider (called a curve at Brooks) was over 4 MPH faster last night, averaging over 85. The change-up was a bit firmer, but it had a bit more downward break. I don’t want to make too much of this, as he only threw two of them, and both were pretty bad, but it’s something to watch for. Dipoto obviously loves the guy, and the M’s used him in a tight ballgame in the 8th, which shows the confidence they have in him. I still don’t see a whole lot that’s noteworthy about the FB, but the change could be interesting in the future. I suppose I should mention that his release point is right smack above the midpoint of the rubber, so he may have less in the way of platoon split issues, but we’ll see. For now, it’s just good to see him out there again now that his neck issue has subsided.

Game 69, Red Sox at Mariners

marc w · June 14, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

King Felix vs. David Price, 7:10pm

Happy Felix Day. Yes, Felix Days haven’t been the most joyous occasions this year, but everything else about the team is so damn fun that it’s all feels like a big party. Felix has been the rotation’s weakest member, and today he’s up against one of the best teams in baseball – possibly the best. Opposing him is a Cy Young winner. I have no idea how the M’s are supposed to win this, but I now believe that they will. Maybe their 1B who’s sporting a sub-.300 OBP will hit another critical HR. Maybe Mitch Haniger will continue a Troutian hot streak. Maybe it’ll be Mike Zunino. It doesn’t really matter, and that’s the fun part.

At different times this year, this team has been carried by frankly unsustainable performances. When those players return to the mortal plane, someone else steps up. This is how they’re able to overcome a month+ cold snap from Dee Gordon, their lead-off hitter who is ALSO sporting a sub-.300 OBP. Because Ben Gamel decided to get off the mat and do that weird .450 BABIP trick for a while. Or Ryon Healy who was AWOL for April, then essentially won the Cleveland road series single-handedly, then fell apart again, and is now a serious power threat again. The fact that it won’t last doesn’t matter – he’s helping the team win, and now we just expect someone else to fill in for him. Maybe Kyle Seager will finally go on a tear. Maybe Nelson Cruz’s hot streak just doesn’t end for another month and a half. Embrace the weirdness, revel in the run differential-flouting timeliness of the M’s in 2018. Have fun.

Being an M’s fan has not, historically, offered a surfeit of Fun Times. Certainly in the last 17 years or so they’ve been especially rare. So we’ve got to enjoy this for the crazy, unexpected bounty that it is. It may all blow up, but that’s irrelevant to what we do with this gift we’ve been given. Go Felix, and Go M’s.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Heredia, CF
8: Span, LF
9: Zunino, C
SP: Felix Hernandez

Game 68, Angels at Mariners – Brooms Out

marc w · June 13, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

Marco Gonzales vs. Garrett Richards, 1:10pm

After two *consecutive* games in which Mike Trout has had multi-homer nights, the M’s go for the sweep today behind Marco Gonzales, one of the league’s hottest starters. I’ve said all I can say about how improbable and bizarre this run is, but The Ringer’s Ben Lindbergh has a great post today on the M’s and how we long-suffering fans deserve a little luck on our side for a change.

That post shows how the M’s are faring vis a vis their preseason projections at each position. What’s striking to me about that exercise is that, at least for the position players, the projections *correctly* ID’d 1B as a concern, and has been mostly right about a number of spots. They also saw Jean Segura and Mitch Haniger as above-average players. Where they missed is just how FAR above-average those two would be. Segura’s absolutely on fire right now, but Haniger’s had both a torrid streak and a cold snap, and I feel we have a pretty good handle on who he is as a player. Those projections undersold his patience and power, and he’s demonstrated both this year. Segura’s BABIP may eventually come down a bit, but he’s both hitting for a touch more power and demonstrating able defense at SS, and thus blowing his own projections out of the water. Those projections accounted for each guy’s potential to collapse – Haniger’s swing-and-miss getting the best of him, or posting a stubbornly low average, and Segura regressing to his 2014-15 nadir. What I think we’re seeing is that their FLOOR was a lot higher than the projections thought; Jean’s simply not the same hitter (or person) he was in Milwaukee, and Haniger’s a better all-around hitter than he first came up in the Brewers and D-Backs systems.

Spin-master Garrett Richards dominated the M’s in his first start against them, but the M’s are absolutely magical now, so…uh, good luck with that one, Garrett. Richards K% is over 27% this year, a mark that would easily be a new career high for him. But his control problems that were evident as early as the Cactus League haven’t subsided, so he’s on track to set a career high in BB%, too. Whether its his freakish spin rates or a deceptive delivery, Richards has never shown much in the way of platoon splits.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, CF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B Andrew Romine, 3B
6: Span, LF
7: Healy, 1B
8: Gamel, RF
9: Zunino, C
SP: Gonzales

Making his debut for the Angels today is 3B David Fletcher, whom you may have heard of through Carson Cistulli’s remarkably effective Fringe Five series at Fangraphs. Prior to this year, Fletcher was a low-power, low-K oddball, someone with good bat-to-ball skills, but without a position that would allow that particular skillset to play. This year, seemingly out of nowhere, he’s hitting for some power. A swing-change guy? No, not really – his fly ball rate is actually down, it’s just that more of them are leaving the yard. Salt Lake City effect? Maybe, though he didn’t show this in half a year there in 2017. We’ll see how he looks now that Zack Cozart’s shifted over to SS as the Angels wait for the return of Andrelton Simmons. In related news, it’s stunning just how different this line-up looks without Simmons, who’d blossomed at the plate for Anaheim. Imagine the M’s without Segura. Yeeesh.

The M’s have signed most of their recent draft picks, including 11th rounder, Damon Casetta-Stubbs. Josh Stowers, Michael Plassmeyer, Jake Anchia, Joey O’Brien, and Joey Gerber are some of the top-10 rounders who’ve inked deals. Still waiting – and probably not for long – on 1st rounder Logan Gilbert, 3rd rounder Cal Raleigh, and the rest.

The Rainiers welcome Omaha to Tacoma tonight, as the R’s kick off a homestand against the Royals’ affiliate. They were off after their first extra-inning win in Nashville on Monday night.
Arkansas starts a series in Springfield against the Cardinals. The Travs lost to NW Arkansas last night 7-4, as the Naturals took advantage of a rare off-night from RP Art Warren. One of the batters Warren walked? Former Rainier and Team Italy mainstay Alex Liddi.
Modesto continues a series in Visalia; the Rawhide destroyed the Nuts last night 11-3. Randy Bell gets the start for Modesto in tonight’s game.
Clinton got blanked by Astros’ affiliate Quad Cities yesterday 4-0, but the two teams are back at it tonight, with the Lumberkings giving the ball to Clay Chandler to start.

Game 66, Angels at Mariners

marc w · June 12, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

Mike Leake vs. Jaime Barria, 7:10pm

Corey Brock’s got an interesting article at The Athletic today, with some great quotes from Jerry Dipoto and Scott Servais on the M’s run differential. Sure, many analysts look at their solid but unspectacular run differential and see a team that’s lucky rather than elite, but the M’s have a different set of numbers they look at: a plus/minus-based Control the Zone metric. Essentially, you take the pitching staff’s K’s plus the batters’ walks and subtract the inverse – pitcher walks and batter K’s. Good zone-related outcomes minus bad zone-related outcomes. When you do that, you find the M’s come out at +80, a far sight better than last year.

But, I mean, we’re having this discussion because the team’s doing so much better than last year. We don’t really need a new zone metric to tell us that this year the M’s have played better. Does this new plus/minus number show that the M’s are one of the league’s best teams, unlike run differential? Well, not really. The M’s +80 is still a far cry from the Astros’ + 192. And it’s slightly below the Angels’ +84. The M’s run differential doesn’t show an *awful* team, it shows a good, wild-card contending club that’s just not quite as good as their record. That’s what this CtZ number shows as well. The two are correlated quite well, which makes sense if you think about it. Thus, the best clubs by CtZ are the same as the best clubs by pythagenpat or base runs. The Dodgers show up as the anti-M’s, a team with an unbelievably good CtZ, but a barely .500 record. But hey, run differential shows that too! All in all, the M’s rank 8th in baseball by this measure, 6th in the AL behind the Astros, Red Sox, Yankees, Indians, and Angels. It tells a story, it’s easy to wrap your head around, and it’s reflective of an organizational philosophy, so it’s not meaningless. It’s just not an effective retort to people who point out that the M’s run differential doesn’t look all that impressive.

You know what IS an effective retort to those people? The M’s record. Continuing to win baseball games. Letting the irrationality become part of the charm.

Jaime Barria is a soon-to-be-22-year old who’s served as the Angels’ 6th rotation member for much of the year, bouncing between AAA and the Majors and filling in when off-days don’t allow sufficient rest. With the injury to Shohei Ohtani, it seems like we’ll be seeing more of Barria going forward. He was signed out of the DR by the Angels (under Dipoto’s watch), but the bonus must not have been large enough to merit a blurb in BA. He moved steadily up the ranks in what was generally seen as one of the worst farm systems, but never attracted much attention. He cracked the Angels top 10 this preseason, though, albeit with a note that could’ve been cribbed from Andrew Moore’s – high floor/back-of-the-rotation-type is the sens you get. As mentioned there, he throws from a high 3/4 arm slot, and his resulting straight fastball has solid rise, but at average to a tick worse velocity. Like so many pitchers these days, he goes to his secondaries *a lot*. Righties see more sliders than fastballs, and lefties see about 50% fastballs and then a mix of sliders and change-ups. Barria’s great ERA is in part the result of amazing strand rate and BABIP numbers. He’s avoided really good contact by and large, according to Statcast’s numbers, but that may be due to his unfamiliarity.

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Gamel, LF
8: Heredia, CF
9: Freitas, C
SP: Leake

If you were wondering who the M’s would send to Boston to complete the Roenis Elias trade, we now know: it’s Eric Filia, the older prospect who missed time this year due to suspension. As an older corner defender without a ton of power (and a 20th-round pick), he was always something of a longshot, and would need to hit a ton at every level. Undeterred, Filia…hit a ton at every level. He’s played just 13 games this year for Arkansas, but has 23 hits already, and a nice little .426/.508/.537 line. For his career, he’s at .343/.428/.460.

Game 66, Angels at Mariners – It Begins

marc w · June 11, 2018 · Filed Under Mariners

Wade LeBlanc vs. Andrew Heaney, 7:10pm

After a brief respite in Tampa, the M’s schedule turns sour for a bit, as the M’s face the Angels, Red Sox and Yankees for a while. People have been eyeballing this slate of games since before the season started, with the optimists considering this an absolutely critical stretch against likely wild card opponents. Here we are, and indeed, these three are the competition for the two WC spots – you figure one will go to the loser of the East, leaving the second for the AL West to fight over. The Angels hot start showed that they’d be a strong opponent, but they stumbled a bit in May, and today came the crushing news that Shohei Ohtani’s been shut down with ulnar collateral ligament strain – one that may need Tommy John surgery to repair.

The Angels appeared to do everything right with Ohtani. They employed a modified 6-man rotation, they gave him plenty of rest, and gave him fewer innings than other starters. He rewarded them with brilliant pitching when he was healthy, but then that’s been Ohtani’s issue the past few years. I’ll be honest, I think he’s great for baseball and I was hoping he’d be a star in MLB. I wanted Ohtani to succeed and for the Angels to blow it anyway. I sincerely hope the TJ talk is just worst case scenario-ism, and that he’ll return this year. If not, I hope he comes back and hits triple digits again. And that the Angels *still* blow it anyway.

I’m not sure if it’s the 6-man rotation or what, but the Angels staff has been stouter than I would’ve thought. Garrett Richards is turning in a decent season, but they’ve been buoyed by the emergence – finally – of Tyler Skaggs, and the more than solid fill-in, Jaime Barria. Still, the big breakout (aside from Ohtani) has been Andrew Heaney, himself coming off of TJ surgery rehab. Specifically, the lefty’s command has enabled him to post an above-average K-BB% while limiting HRs. After allowing 12 in his 20-odd innings last season, he’s allowed just 4 in 60 2/3. His velocity’s up a bit since his return – now at 92+ with his running sinker, thrown from a low-3/4 arm slot. His best pitch is a slurvey curve/slider thing that he throws a ton of to lefties, but he’s also got a firm change-up at 83-84 that he employs to righties.

With a lower arm slot and a sinker/kinda-slider arsenal, it’s no big shock that his platoon splits are pretty sizable. This is definitely a better match-up for Jean Segura/Mitch Haniger/Nelson Cruz, but his curve has been better this year, even to righties. That said, what seems to have made a difference for him is his primary fastball, the sinker. In general, sinkers have less spin than four-seamers, with less pure backspin producing “rise.” Heaney’s, though, gets plus spin, which may help it miss some bats. From Statcast, it looks like Heaney’s spin rate has improved since his TJ surgery, which may be a byproduct of that increased velo. But it *also* looks like he’s getting some extra cutter spin – that is, some spin that does NOT produce movement. Heaney’s armside run was higher back in 2015…but his spin was lower. This may be what’s happened with James Paxton this year, too – his spin rate keeps rising, but his…uh…rise does not follow suit. That is to say, Paxton’s adding extra spin without it influencing the movement of the pitch. With so much emphasis on spin efficiency, is that “cut” spin doing anything useful? I don’t know, but it certainly seems to be working for Big Maple – and it’s been effective for Garrett Richards, the guy who occasioned me learning about gyro spin in the first place a few years back. Whatever it is, Heaney’s fastball has been more effective than in the past, and that’s made a big difference for him.

Speaking of more effective fastballs, the entire Mariner team has been on a roll, and they’ve done it in much the same fashion as Heaney – they stopped allowing dingers. A bit over a year ago, I wrote a post about how much of the HR explosion had to do with four-seam fastballs. That’s less true now, as the percentage of four-seamers that turn into dingers is down fractionally, even as the overall percentage of four-seamers thrown remains the same as last year (35.5% according to MLB). The M’s are throwing dramatically fewer four-seamers and have actually allowed the fewest HRs on four-seamers of any club in the game. For a team that led MLB in HRs in 2016, and came darn close to repeating that feat last year, this is noteworthy. If you’ve watched Felix recently, it won’t come as much of a shock that they are giving up too many HRs in the NON four-seam FB category, but the numbers are low enough that that seems like an easier problem to deal with. In any event, it’s something to watch the rest of the way – are the M’s changing their pitching strategy? And is that what’s behind the resurgence of guys like Marco Gonzales, Mike Leake, and today’s starter, Wade LeBlanc?

1: Gordon, 2B
2: Segura, SS
3: Haniger, RF
4: Cruz, DH
5: Seager, 3B
6: Healy, 1B
7: Heredia, CF
8: Span, LF
9: Zunino, C
SP: LeBlanc

Christian Bergman and Max Povse start for Tacoma and Arkansas, respectively, and look to continue a run of effective starts. Colin Rogers and Ryne Inman take the hill in the lower levels of the system.

Clinton swept a double-header from Kane County yesterday and are closing in on a first-half title in the Western division of the Midwest League. Modesto, who got blown out by San Jose, are in last in their division, and already eliminated mathematically from the first-half race. Arkansas leads their division, albeit with a record of just 32-30; no other team in the North division has a .500 record. Tacoma’s 7.5 games out in the Pacific Coast League’s pacific north division.

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